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Table 3 Council members’ perceptions about their experience of involvement in the councils

From: “They heard our voice!” patient engagement councils in community-based primary care practices: a participatory action research pilot study

Patients’ Perceptions (N = 22)
Patients’ confidence in their ability to identify CBPCP priorities to improve services and QIa, median (min-max)
 At the beginning of the study (N = 22) 5 (1–10)
 At the end of the study (N = 15) 8 (4–9)
Three main motives of patients to engage in the council at the beginning, n (%)
 To help staff to improve healthcare and services 22 (100.0)
 To improve patient experience of care in the CBPCP 20 (78.0)
 To improve relevance of research projects 17 (54.0)
Patients satisfied with the training (in first meeting) (N = 21), n (%)
 Definitely satisfied 21 (100.0)
Patients perceiving training (in first meeting) as useful for their participation (N = 21), n (%)
 Totally agree 20 (95.0)
 Not sure 1 (5.0)
Barriers to participation for patients, n (%)
 Time constraints 14 (60.0)
 Involvement in work or family activities 11 (50.0)
 No perceived impact on services to CPBCP patients 11 (50.0)
 No perceived impact on patient experience in the CPBCP 11 (50.0)
 No funding / financial compensation 1 (4.5)
Patients’ perception that councils had an impact on the CBPCP at the end of the project (N = 15), n (%)
 Yes 10 (66.7)
 No 0 (0.0)
 Don’t know 5 (33.3)
Patients’ willingness to participate again in such a council (N = 15), n (%)
 Yes 12 (80.0)
 No 2 (13.3)
 Not sure 1 (6.7)
Patients satisfactiona regarding their participation in the council (N = 15), median (min-max)
 Overall satisfaction 8 (6–10)
 Interactions with other patients 8 (5–10)
 Interactions with the clinician 8 (8–10)
 Interactions with the manager 9 (7–10)
 Interactions with the patient-expert facilitators 9 (8–10)
Clinicians and managers’ perceptions (N = 4)
Three main motives of clinicians and managers to engage in the councils, n (%)
 To improve patient experience of care in the CBPCP 4 (100.0)
 To improve practices of CBPCP health professionals 4 (100.0)
 To contribute to developing new scientific knowledge 4 (100.0)
Barriers to participation for clinicians and managers, n (%)
 Time constraints 4 (100.0)
 No perceived impact on services to CPBCP patients 1 (25.0)
 Lack of confidence in researchers 2 (50.0)
 No funding / financial compensation 0 (0.0)
  1. POR Patient Oriented Research, QI Quality Improvement, M Men, W Women, P patient, CBPCP Community-based primary care practice, A CBPCP-A, B CBPCP-B
  2. aOn a 0 to 10 scale, highest values meaning high perception