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  1. Content type: Research article

    In Australia, since 2009, the Consumer and Community Involvement Program (formerly the Consumer and Community Participation Program) has developed and run workshops to help people working in health and medical...

    Authors: Anne McKenzie, Kirsten Alpers, Jane Heyworth, Cindy Phuong and Bec Hanley

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:16

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  2. Content type: Research article

    Funders of research are increasingly requiring researchers to involve patients and the public in their research. Patient and public involvement (PPI) in research can potentially help researchers make sure that...

    Authors: Heather J. Bagley, Hannah Short, Nicola L. Harman, Helen R. Hickey, Carrol L. Gamble, Kerry Woolfall, Bridget Young and Paula R. Williamson

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:15

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  3. Content type: Research article

    The behaviour of people with diabetes (e.g. taking medication) and the behaviour of doctors and other healthcare professionals (e.g. checking patients’ blood sugar) are important. Our research group wanted to ...

    Authors: Jennifer Mc Sharry, Milou Fredrix, Lisa Hynes and Molly Byrne

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:14

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  4. Content type: Research article

    The James Lind Alliance (JLA) brings patients, carers and clinicians together in Priority Setting Partnerships (PSPs) to identify and prioritise shared uncertainties about the effects of treatment. The JLA eme...

    Authors: Mary Madden and Richard Morley

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:12

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  5. Content type: Research article

    The National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Research Design Service (RDS) for Yorkshire and Humber has been running a public involvement funding scheme since 2008. This scheme awards researchers a small ...

    Authors: Susan Baxter, Delia Muir, Louise Brereton, Christine Allmark, Rosemary Barber, Lydia Harris, Brian Hodges, Samaira Khan and Wendy Baird

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:13

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  6. Content type: Methodology

    It is recommended that research studies are carried out with or by patients and the public through their involvement from the beginning and in as many stages as possible (known as PPI). Some studies formally i...

    Authors: Heather Morgan, Gill Thomson, Nicola Crossland, Fiona Dykes and Pat Hoddinott

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:7

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  7. Content type: Research article

    Health technology appraisal involves reviewing the findings from clinical trials and economic data to produce guidance on how health technology should be used. This task is carried out by appraisal committees ...

    Authors: Kristina Staley and Caroline Doherty

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:4

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  8. Content type: Research article

    People with osteoarthritis desire high quality care, support and information. However, the quality of care for people with OA in general practice is not routinely collected. Quality Indicators can be used to b...

    Authors: Steven Blackburn, Adele Higginbottom, Robert Taylor, Jo Bird, Nina Østerås, Kåre Birger Hagen, John J. Edwards, Kelvin P. Jordan, Clare Jinks and Krysia Dziedzic

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:5

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  9. Content type: Review article

    The importance of citizen involvement in healthcare research and planning has been widely recognized. There is however, a lack of understanding of how best to engage older adults, Canada's fastest growing segm...

    Authors: Heather McNeil, Jacobi Elliott, Kelsey Huson, Jessica Ashbourne, George Heckman, Jennifer Walker and Paul Stolee

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:10

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  10. Content type: Research article

    In the United Kingdom (UK), official bodies such as the Department of Health and research funders such as the National Institute for Health Research support and encourage lay involvement in all stages of resea...

    Authors: Carole Mockford, Matt Murray, Kate Seers, Jan Oyebode, Richard Grant, Sue Boex, Sophie Staniszewska, Yvonne Diment, Jim Leach, Uma Sharma, Rosemary Clarke and Rashida Suleman

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:8

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  11. Content type: Commentary

    Engaging patients in research studies is becoming more common because it makes research and its results more relevant for patients. It is important to understand the best ways for patients and researchers to w...

    Authors: Dianne S. Johnson, Mary T. Bush, Susan Brandzel and Karen J. Wernli

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:6

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  12. Content type: Commentary

    A one day public engagement workshop was held to focus on the priorities of older people about research and practice in health and social care. Seventy-five older people from the general public and a variety o...

    Authors: Dalal Alsaeed, Nathan Davies, Julia Fiona-Maree Gilmartin, Elizabeth Jamieson, Kalpa Kharicha, Ann E. M. Liljas, Bahijja Tolulope Raimi-Abraham, Janine Aldridge, Felicity J. Smith, Kate Walters and Mine Orlu Gul

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:2

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  13. Content type: Methodology

    The international literature on patient and public involvement (PPI) in research covers a wide range of issues, including active lay involvement throughout the research cycle; roles that patients/public can pl...

    Authors: Clare Jinks, Pam Carter, Carol Rhodes, Robert Taylor, Roger Beech, Krysia Dziedzic, Steven Blackburn, Rhian Hughes and Bie Nio Ong

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2016 2:1

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  14. Content type: Research article

    Involving patients and the public in research helps to ensure that research remains relevant, and has an impact on the people it aims to benefit. Funding bodies now require patients and the public to be involv...

    Authors: Lisa M. Andrews, Helen Allen, Zoë A. Sheppard, Guy Baylis and Thomas W. Wainwright

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:13

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  15. Content type: Research article

    Myalgic encephalitis (M.E.) is a common condition, the cause of which is not known and there are no treatments available. In this study the national patient support group Action for M.E. sought the opinions of...

    Authors: Nicola Childs, Lisa Robinson, Sonya Chowdhury, Clare Ogden and Julia L. Newton

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:11

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  16. Content type: Research article

    Within health services research in the UK, there has been growing interest in evidence-based medicine (EBM) and patient and public involvement (PPI) in research. These two movements have a common goal of impro...

    Authors: Andy Gibson, Kate Boddy, Kath Maguire and Nicky Britten

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:10

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  17. Content type: Research article

    Public health research sometimes uses members of communities as researchers. These are called Community Researchers. The advantage of using Community Researchers is that it enables people who live in communiti...

    Authors: Sarah Salway, Punita Chowbey, Elizabeth Such and Beverly Ferguson

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:9

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  18. Content type: Research article

    There is a consensus that patients and the public should be involved in research in a meaningful way. To date, lay people have been mostly involved in developing research ideas and commenting on patient inform...

    Authors: Sara Garfield, Seetal Jheeta, Ann Jacklin, Anna Bischler, Christine Norton and Bryony D. Franklin

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:8

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  19. Content type: Research article

    Healthcare workers want to listen more to patients and their carers in all sorts of areas of healthcare. This can include choosing topics for medical research. We looked at how patients and carers have helped ...

    Authors: R. Snow, J C Crocker and S. Crowe

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:7

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  20. Content type: Review article

    Biobanks are collections of donations of biological material (DNA, cells, tissue etc.) and related data which are very valuable for research into human diseases. A variety of biobanks exist for example within ...

    Authors: Derick Mitchell, Jan Geissler, Alison Parry-Jones, Hans Keulen, Doris C. Schmitt, Rosaria Vavassori and Balwir Matharoo-Ball

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:4

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  21. Content type: Editorial

    This editorial introduces the new, online, open-access journal Research Involvement and Engagement. The journal considers manuscripts on any aspect of the engagement or involvement of patients, carers or members ...

    Authors: Richard Stephens and Sophie Staniszewska

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:1

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  22. Content type: Research article

    There is some evidence that there is a mismatch between what patients and health professionals want to see researched and the research that is actually done. The James Lind Alliance (JLA) research Priority Set...

    Authors: Sally Crowe, Mark Fenton, Matthew Hall, Katherine Cowan and Iain Chalmers

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:2

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    The Erratum to this article has been published in Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:14

  23. Content type: Commentary

    This commentary talks about patient involvement in one of the biggest EU projects to date—U-BIOPRED. It describes how people and carers of people with asthma have been able to develop and drive their input and...

    Authors: David Supple, Amanda Roberts, Val Hudson, Sarah Masefield, Neil Fitch, Malayka Rahmen, Breda Flood, Willem de Boer, Pippa Powell and Scott Wagers

    Citation: Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:5

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    The Erratum to this article has been published in Research Involvement and Engagement 2015 1:12

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